Why every undigested protein is an allergen

We come out of our mother’s womb, and we are very soon thereafter given a bottle to suckle on. In the bottle there’s a powdered ‘infant formula’ mixed with water, or milk, or both. “The most commonly used infant formulas contain purified cow’s milk whey and casein as a protein source, a blend of vegetable oils as a fat source, lactose as a carbohydrate source, a vitamin-mineral mix, and other ingredients depending on the manufacturer” (source: Wikipedia). The water is municipal tap water with residues of agricultural and industrial chemicals, of prescription drugs of various kinds, fluoride that suppresses the immune system and makes the bones and teeth brittle, and chlorine that kills the bacteria and destroys the flora of the gut. The milk is most likely UHT, which stands for ultra high temperature pasteurised, cow’s milk from cows that have never set food outside, have never eaten a blade of grass, have only ever eaten soy, oats, and corn, and have their whole lives received antibiotics preventatively to lower the probability infection due to the fact that they are sick and immunosuppressed from the living conditions they are subjected to. How’s that for a start?

We start teething and we are given ‘teething cookies’ to nibble on. Cookies, like Gerber’s classic arrowroot cookie, made wheat and arrowroot flours, dairy proteins and solids, vegetable oils, sugars, and other stuff like stabilisers, preservatives, texture and flavour enhancers, and some added vitamins and minerals, of course.

We don’t need to have teeth to have ice cream. In fact, parents are encouraged to give cold things like ice cream teething infants to soothe their gums aching from the teeth pushing through them. And we love it, of course! We’re still far from being able to speak, but we eagerly await the next spoonful, which, if delayed too long, makes us impatient, and soon angry enough to cry out and let our parents know we want more.

Naturally, we never make a fuss when we are fed apple sauce, or pear sauce, or pureed bananas, peaches, or apricots, nor when we are are given mixes like banana-strawberry, or strawberry-kiwi, or even apple-carrot-parsnips. We also like sweet potatoes, squash, and even regular mashed potatoes with our pureed meals. But the green things like mashed pees or broccoli, that we like less—quite a lot less.

We always start the day with orange juice. In fact, this is so much a part of our upbringing that we can’t even imagine a morning with having orange juice. And as soon as we can chew, our breakfast is made of those delicious, sweet and crunchy cereals served in a big bowl of milk. This is another part of our upbringing that is so much a part of us that we  often consider it a normal part of life, and can’t imagine a life with it.

We snack on cookies, on muffins, on granola bars, and particularly like the chocolate covered ones. We snack on chips, crunchy and salty—on Doritos, Pringles, and all sorts of different kinds of chips—and we love them too. We love our regular home pasta dinners, our pizza dinners, our hot dogs, our burgers, our fries. When we’re hungry in the afternoon, we make ourselves those delicious peanut butter and raspberry jam sandwiches on ultra moist slices of white bread, and they’re so good we have a hard time to stop eating them one after another. And what about our Nutella, that amazing chocolate spread we can never have enough of? We really could eat the whole jar if we didn’t force ourselves to stop. It’s so delicious we even eat it by the spoonful when we don’t feel like having bread with it. And they tell us it’s good for us, that’s a good source of nutritious milk and hazelnuts. Wow! How great!

We get sick pretty often as school children, but not more than anyone else, about ten times a year or so. Our parents seem to get colds less often than we do, only about 4 or five times per year. Sometimes it’s worse than others, and we are given antibiotics. We take them because our parents give them to us. And they give them to us because our family doctor tells them to. We get loose stools for a while, and we don’t understand why. After some time, things kind of get back to normal.

We go on like this for years. Actually, usually for at least two or three decades. Everything we do destroys our gut flora. All the foods, the chemicals, the drugs, destroy the essential health-promoting bacteria and the balance between the different varieties that are meant to populate the gut, and at the same time promote the overgrowth of specific kinds of pathogenic bacteria and yeasts that take over our gut.

All the foods we eat are loaded with lectins that damage the lining of our gut, making it thinner, less functional, less protective, and more vulnerable to further damage. This damaged gut with its damaged lining and damaged glycocalyx becomes leaky. Not only do we not digest food properly, not only do we not absorb nutrients properly, not only do we not excrete wastes properly, but all sorts of stuff starts leaking from our gut into our blood. And possibly the worst thing that can happen is to have a leak into our bloodstream of undigested proteins.

The reason is that undigested proteins in the blood trigger the immune system that responds to them as allergens. As this is the result of a degenerative process, and is therefore a chronic condition that grows more severe with time, the dysfunction eventually manifests itself into auto-immune disease conditions. Those ‘incurable’ disease conditions on which modern conventional medicine has given up. This is how serious it is.

Proteins from out food are not meant to enter the bloodstream—ever. So much so that the kidneys will completely clog themselves up trying to remove proteins from the bloodstream to the point of kidney failure. Proteins are meant to be broken down into the much smaller units of which they are made called amino acids. And breaking down proteins into amino acids is meant to be done by the stomach before entering the intestines. Hence, having not fully broken down proteins in the gut can only really happen if they haven’t been broken down while they were in the stomach. Clearly, it isn’t therefore only the gut that is dysfunctional and damaged: the stomach must also be dysfunctional in some way to allow these undigested proteins to pass into the intestines in the first place.

We have previously looked in detail at the process of digestion in Understanding digestion. The essence of what we need to know is that the stomach has specialised cells whose purpose is to secrete hydrochloric acid to break down proteins; that acid is produced when these cells detect the presence of protein in the stomach; that as proteins are broken down, the pH rises and the stomach secretes more acid to keep the pH low in order to continue breaking down the protein; that when the pH stays low for a few hours or so, this signals that all the proteins have been properly broken down, and that the chyme (the processed contents of the stomach) can be transferred to the small intestine; and that at which point the stomach valve opens, the acidic chyme moves through, and the pancreas injects into the small intestines a concentrated solution of bicarbonate to neutralise the acid which would otherwise damage the lining of the intestines. This is how it’s supposed to work.

But if there isn’t enough bicarbonate in the system, the pancreas cannot do this properly. If there isn’t enough water, the pancreas cannot do this properly. If the stomach doesn’t produce enough acid, the proteins are not broken down properly. And if the acid producing cells of the stomach are not regularly exposed to high concentrations of hydrochloric acid, they lose their ability to produce it. This happens when little or no concentrated sources of protein are eaten, like when we are vegetarian or vegan for a long time. But it also happens when the lining of the stomach, which is supposed to be protected by a thick layer of mucus while digesting protein, is instead exposed to and damaged by its own hydrochloric acid. This happens when there isn’t enough water to make that protective layer of mucus, and it is why we should drink water before meals.

So, here’s what we get: not enough water or bicarbonate—loss of acid-neutralising function of pancreas, and damage to intestines; not enough protein in the diet—loss of acid production ability, and undigested proteins; not enough water—damage of stomach lining, loss of acid production ability, and undigested proteins; undigested proteins—chronic immune response to circulating allergens and autoimmune disease conditions. This is compounded with the damage that results from exposure to chemicals and antibiotics, from the overload of sugars and starches, and from the destruction of the cells lining the gut by the lectins in our diet.

The end result is, as expected, precisely what we observe: a population where basically everyone has, to some extent, compromised digestion, and therefore, a population where everyone is, to some extent, sick. Because we don’t know any of this, because we don’t know how food affects the body, because we don’t know how the organs of the body function, because we don’t now how digestion works, and because nobody else around us knows any of it either, we believe everything is normal and everything is just fine, just as it should be, just as it always has been. But the truth is that it isn’t.

What’s actually hard to believe is how simple the solution is: 1) avoid as much as possible exposure to chemicals and antibiotics, and adopt measures to systematically help the systems of the body cope with and recover from the exposure we cannot entirely avoid; 2) avoid as much as possible the overload of sugars and starches, and focus on animal protein and fats from free range animals, and green vegetables. This will automatically lead to a nutrient-dense, whole foods diet that also minimises exposure to gut-damaging lectins; 3) drink plenty of clean water to ensure good hydration, especially with enough time to replenish the stomach’s and pancreas’s reserves before meals, and take a little extra bicarbonate on an empty stomach with your first glass of water in the morning to maintain a good alkaline buffer and balance.

 

This strategy is so simple, and yet it is both preventative and curative. The extent to which we need to be strict depends on the extent of the damage from which we need to recover. And as it true for everything, it’s far easier to prevent damage than to recover from it. That’s obvious but it’s good to remind ourselves of it when our motivation weakens or strength of will falters. The amazing news is that, as shown by doctors Terry Wahls and Steven Gundry who specialise in the treatment of autoimmune disease conditions, recovery from even the most severe cases is virtually guaranteed and only a matter of consistency, patience, and time. I hope this is enough of a motivation for you. Enough of a motivation to at least start to make the effort to regain and then preserve the health of your gut and digestive system—the system on which everything about your health depends.

Oh, and breakfast? Just skip it and have your first meal at lunchtime. Breakfast is not, as we have been told over and over again, the most important meal of the day. It’s actually the most important meal of the day to skip. We’ll get back to this point some other time.

Healthy and lucid from childhood to old age

So you’ve been around for 70 years, and you’re still well enough to read this. Have you actually made it past 75, 80 or even 85? This is really great! Through a combination of different factors, various reasons, personal habits and choices, you have made this far.

Maybe because of your genetic makeup: Your parents and grand-parents all lived well into their 80’s or 90’s by following a kind of innate, traditional wisdom based on the understanding that we really are what we eat, in a very real sense, and you’ve done more or less the same, following in their footsteps.

Maybe because you have always been moderate in your eating habits: You’ve never been overweight; you’ve never eaten much sweets or deserts; you’ve never eaten much preserved meats and canned foods; you’ve never drank much alcohol; you’ve never drank sweetened soft drinks, juice or milk—mostly just water, always paying attention not to drink too much coffee or strongly caffeinated tea.

Maybe you have made it this far because you have also been moderately active throughout your life, never exercising too much or too intensely, but always quite regularly: Walking; doing light exercises for your joints (rotations of the arms for your shoulders, stretches for your neck and back, and exercises for your knees); riding a bike a couple times a week in the good season, not getting off the bike but instead riding up those hills; maybe you went skiing a week or two most years; went for long walks or even hikes in the mountains during holidays; or did a little swimming in the sea or in lakes when the occasion presented itself.

The golden middleas my grand-father called it: everything is moderation. And he almost made it to 90 years of age! But no matter what the reason is, it is truly wonderful that you have indeed made it this far. Then again, you might be young or middle aged, but interested—maybe somewhat, maybe highly, but nonetheless interested—in being healthy and lucid for as long as possible, and hopefully well into your old age.

Either way, young or old, you live in this modern world like most of us. You live in a city, you drive a car, you work in an office, you fly or flew often on business trips, maybe even several times per week. You eat meat and fish; bread, potatoes, rice and pasta; fruits and vegetables, all from the supermarket.  And so you have, throughout your life, been continuously exposed to increasing amounts of chemicals, heavy metals and various other toxins in our environment, most of which have been accumulating in your tissues. You live in the modern world like most of us, and so you have taken medication on various occasions during your life: antibiotics a few times, maybe some pain killers, maybe some sleeping pills, maybe simple anti-histamines when you had a cold. Maybe you are and have even been taking medication on a daily basis for some “minor” but “chronic” condition.

You live in this modern world and so you have been told to drink plenty of fluids and that salt is bad and should be avoided. You’ve been told that fat in general, but especially saturated fats and cholesterol, are bad because they cause heart disease: they cause your arteries to clog up with fatty plaques that eventually block them to give you a heart attack. You’ve been told to avoid them as much as you can, and instead to consume polyunsaturated vegetable oils, plenty of whole grains and cereal products, legumes, plenty of fruits and vegetables, and so you have done that: you have decreased or almost eliminated your intake of butter, eggs, fatty cheese, fatty yoghurt, red meat—never ever eating the fatty trimmings, and also of the fatty skin on chicken or fish.

Consequently, you have increased your intake of morning cereal—but only sugar-free whole grain cereal like muesli; increased your intake of bread—but usually whole grain bread; increased your intake of rice—but usually brown rice; increased your intake of pasta—but usually also whole grain pasta; and increased you intake of potatoes—but never fried, only baked, steamed or boiled potatoes.

Maybe your total lipoprotein levels are around 220 or 240 mg/dl, and you have been told that this is too high, and for this reason you have tried to further reduce your fat intake, and are even taking statins or other cholesterol-lowering drugs, every day, just like hundreds of millions of other people in this modern world.

Unfortunately, you have not been told that you should be drinking water; not fluids in general, and that there are many reasons water, ageing and disease are intimately connected—the lack of water, that is. In addition to that, you have not been told that it is not enough to drink some water sometimes: it is essential to drink water before meals. Unfortunately, you have not been told that sodium is one of the most important minerals for health: why else would the kidneys, without which we cannot live for more than a few days, go to such great lengths to prevent its excretion in the urine, and keep it in the blood if it wasn’t? But even more unfortunately, you have not been told that minerals in general, are essential for health, and that unrefined sea salt contains all naturally occurring trace minerals is proportions that closely match those of several of our bodily fluids. And that furthermore, proper bodily function depends intimately on the balance of the minerals available, and that our salt-phobic and calcium-phillic society has led to most of us becoming completely over-calcified while growing more and more deficient in the rest of the trace minerals, and in particular magnesium. The link between generalised magnesium deficiency and minerals, ageing and disease are now everywhere painfully obvious.

Unfortunately—and indeed very sadly—you have not been told that cholesterol is absolutely vital for life and good health: that it forms the membrane of every single cell in your body and in that of every animal, that your entire nervous system and especially your brain are built using cholesterol and depend intimately on the availability of plenty of cholesterol, that your hormonal system relies completely on cholesterol for building hormones, and that your best defences against infectious and inflammatory pathogens are in fact the lipoproteins carrying around the precious cholesterol throughout your body. You have not been told that cholesterol is so important that it is manufactured continuously by our liver to keep up with the body’s needs, and that therefore, the cholesterol we eat does not in any ways raise lipoprotein concentrations. You have not been told that in addition to cholesterol, fat is also essential for building hormones, essential for absorbing minerals from the intestines into our bloodstream, essential for the binding of these minerals into the bones and teeth, essential for energy production in every cell of our body.

Furthermore, you have not been told that saturated fats like those found in animal products and coconut oil are molecularly stable, whereas unsaturated and particularly polyunsaturated oils such as those that make up all vegetable oils are molecularly unstable, some more than others, for the double bonds between carbon atoms in the chain that forms the fat molecule are weak and readily broken to permit some other unstable molecule seeking a free electron to attach in order to make the final molecular configuration stable. But that those unstable compounds are actually scavenging around for any electron to bind to, and unfortunately most of the time if not always, these free-radicals will attach themselves to healthy tissue without proper enzymatic action to guide them in the proper place and position, thus damaging our tissues.

In fact, you have not been told that all large studies that have been conducted to evaluate the “health-promoting” properties of polyunsaturated fats have not only failed to do so, but instead have shown that the more polyunsaturated oils we consume, the more atherosclerotic plaques develop in our arteries, and therefore the more likely we are to suffer a heart attack or stroke. And that on the contrary, the more saturated fats we consume, the less plaques we have, and consequently, the less likely we are to have a heart attack or a stroke (see any of the books about cholesterol in Further readings).

You have not been told, that for millions of years our species has evolved consuming most of its calories in the form of saturated fats from meat and animal products—in some cases exclusively from these, from coconut and palm oil (where these grow), and to a much lesser extent from polyunsaturated fats, and this only in whole foods such as fish, nuts and seeds—never concentrated into vegetable oils.

Unfortunately—and indeed very sadly—you have not been told that we were never meant to eat simple or starchy carbohydrates: that eating such carbohydrates always triggers the pancreas to secrete insulin in order to clear the bloodstream of the damaging glucose in circulation, that chronically elevated glucose levels lead to chronically elevated insulin levels that in turn lead to insulin resistance—first in our muscles, then in our liver, and finally in our fat cells—which leads to type II diabetes, to heart disease from the buildup of plaque in the coronary arteries and vessels, and to Alzheimer’s and cognitive degradation from the buildup of plaque in the cerebral arteries and vessels.

Unfortunately—and indeed very sadly—you have not been told and have not considered that all the multitude of chemicals and heavy metals that we are exposed to in the medications we take, in the air we breathe, in the water we drink, in the food we eat, in the soaps and shampoos we use, and in the household products we employ to keep our house sparkling clean and bacteria-free, accumulate in our bodies. They accumulate in our fat cells, in our tissues, in our organs, in our brains. They burden, disrupt and damage our digestive system, our immune system, our hormonal system, our organs, tissues and cells. Sometimes they reach such concentrations that we become gravely ill, but none of the doctors we visit in seeking a solution and relief understand why. Most often, however, we don’t get gravely ill but instead start developing different kinds of little problems: we get colds more often and take longer to recover, we get mild but regular digestive upsets that we can’t explain and that seem to get worse with time, we get headaches and have trouble sleeping, we feel depressed, tired, alone, helpless, not acutely but enough to disturb us enough that we notice it.

Finally, and maybe most importantly, you have not been told how truly essential vitamin B12 really is, but how, for a variety of different reasons, blood concentrations B12 decrease with age, and eventually dwindle to very low levels. That B12 is essential most crucially to preserve the myelin sheath that covers all of our nerves healthy, and thus crucially important for everything that takes place throughout the nervous system, which means, everything in the body and brain. Levels of B12 should never go below 450 pg/ml, and ideally should be maintained at 800 pg/ml throughout life, from childhood to old age hood.

Can we do anything about all this?

The most fundamental point to understand is that everything about your health depends on the state of health of your digestive system. All absorption of nutrients and elimination of waste happens in the digestive system. Since our health depends on proper absorption and efficient elimination, the digestive system should be our first as well as our main concern.

The first step is to rebuild and establish a healthy intestinal flora of beneficial bacteria (breakdown and absorption), and at the same time begin to detoxify the body and clean out the intestines (elimination). This is done by taking high quality probiotics to supply beneficial bacteria on a daily basis, high quality chlorella to both supply a lot of micronutrients and pull out heavy metals, and water-soluble fibre like psyllium husks to clean out the intestines by pushing out toxins and waste products. If you are not already taking these, read Probiotics, chlorella and psyllium husks.

The second step is by far the most important, and in fact, crucial dietary change necessary to achieve optimal metabolic health. It is to eliminate simple and starchy carbohydrates from you diet, and replace them with more raw vegetables—especially green and leafy salads and colourful vegetables such as red and yellow peppers, more nuts and seeds—especially raw and soaked, more good and efficiently absorbed protein—especially eggs, fish and raw cheeses, and much more saturated fats—especially coconut oil (at least 3 tablespoons per day) and butter. Doing this is  essential for the systemic detoxification, rebuilding and then maintaining a healthy digestive system. Everything should be organic: you obviously don’t want to be adding to your toxic load while trying to detoxify.

And the third step is to supplement our now-excellent, health-promoting diet with a few essential and very important nutrients that are, for most of us, difficult to obtain. The only such supplements that I believe to be essential, and that my family and I take daily, are: Vitamin B12 and vitamin D3—the most important supplements to take for overall health, but in which we are almost all deficient; Krill oil—a high-quality, animal-based omega-3 fat with its own natural anti-oxidants, highly absorbable, and particularly important for proper brain function; Ubiquinol—the reduced and thus useable form of coenzyme Q10, critical for cellular energy production, and a powerful lipid-soluble anti-oxidant that protects our cells from oxidative damage, but both of whose synthesis as CoQ10 and conversion from CoQ10 to ubiquinol drop dramatically after about age 30-40; Vitamin K2—essential for healthy bones but very hard to get other than from fermented foods, which we typically eat little of.

In addition to these, we usually always take Astaxanthin and turmeric—very powerful antioxidants with amazing general and specific anti-ageing health benefits, and also sometimes take a whole-foods-multi—basically dehydrated vegetables and berries made into a powder and compressed into a pill for extra micronutrients. (You can read about all of these supplements on Wikipedia or any other page you will find by doing an internet search.)

I tend to buy our supplements from Dr Joseph Mercola, (whose website also provides a lot of info about these and other supplements, as well as about a multitude of other health-related issues and conditions), because I trust that his are among if not the best on the market: there’s really no point in buying cheap supplements at the pharmacy, and risking doing yourself more harm than good, as would happen with a rancid omega-3 supplement, or a synthetic Vitamin D, for example.

Staying healthy and lucid is, in reality, quite easy and simple. Unfortunately, most of us, including, and maybe especially our medical doctors, just don’t know how. And so, medical diagnostic and high-tech treatment technologies continue to improve and develop, and medical expenditures continue to rise throughout the modern world, but we are sicker than ever: more obesity, more diabetes, more strokes, more heart attacks, more cancers, more Alzheimer’s, more leaky guts, more ulcers, more liver failures, more kidney failures, and on and on. There is more disease, more pain, more suffering and more premature deaths. And all of it is completely unnecessary and avoidable by such simple and inexpensive means as those outlined herein. The only critical point is that only you can do it; nobody else can do it for you.